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SONEA Produces Energy From Noise

Posted in D. Produto, Eco, Energias Limpas, Protótipos by Bruna Miskinis on 09/12/2009

Making use of omnipresent but wasted potential energy sources is what the green movement is all about. The SONEA, designed by Jihoon Kim, Boyeon Kim, Myung-Suk Kim, and Da-Woon Chung, makes use of one of the most annoying, otherwise-useless forms of energy out there: noise. Think about how much noise there is when you walk out into a crowded city street at any given moment of the day. And it’s all for naught. Imagine if there was a reverse speaker of sorts that was able to capture all that wasted noise and store it as usable energy. The SONEA design uses a noise capturing surface paired with a sonic electric tranducer that converts the noise energy into electricity, which is then stored via an electric cell module. The device’s rating is 30 watts per 1 captured decibal.

From: DesignCrave

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ShakEnergy Rechargeable Battery Concept

Posted in D. Produto, Eco, Energias Limpas by Bruna Miskinis on 09/12/2009

The folks from Mintpass have created an innovative ShakEnergy battery concept that uses a human element to maintain their charge. With five components inside that include a rechargeable nickel metal hydrate battery, a shaft, a coiled bobbin, a spring-loaded coil-magnet and a rubber shock-absorber, the ShakEnergy’s innovation is that all it needs is a vigorous shake to charge itself. The ShakEnergy battery has about half of the charge of a normal AA NiMH and can also be used with a normal charger. We’re craving for a set already, but so far, there’s no info concerning a release date.

From: DesignCrave

Tactility Concept Mobile Phone for the Blind, by Toshiba

Posted in D. Produto, Protótipos by Bruna Miskinis on 09/12/2009

A bit simpler than the touchscreen B-Touch Braille mobile, the Tactility features a Braille  keypad to help blind users make phone calls. As mobile phone technology gets more and more advanced, it threatens to leave out blind users who have obvious obstacles when navigating through complex menus and advanced keypads. On the other hand, the simple, Braille-based interface would certainly be much quicker and easier to use than most modern phones. The concept designed by Siwei Liu also includes a ring on the bottom so that users could hang the phone around their neck, having it accessible at all times.

From: DesignCrave